AHA-BUCH

Merits and Limits of Markets
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Merits and Limits of Markets

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ISBN-13:
9783642722127
Einband:
Book
Erscheinungsdatum:
28.01.2012
Seiten:
296
Autor:
Herbert Giersch
Gewicht:
450 g
Format:
235x155x16 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

99
PrefacePART I. INDIVIDUALISM IN A SOCIAL CONTEXT
Gary B. Madison, Self-Interest, Communalism, Welfarism
David M. Anderson, Communitarian Approaches to the Economy
Peter J. Boettke, Rational Choice and Human Agency in Economics and Sociology; Exploring the Weber-Austrian Connection
Stefan Voigt and Daniel Kiwit, The Role and Evolution of Beliefs, Habits, Moral Norms, and Institutions
PART II. THE FRONTIERS OF MARKETS
Bruce L. Benson, Privatization of Legal and Administrative Services
Mark V. Pauly, Competition in the Market for Health Services and Insurance, with Special Reference to the United States
Edwin G. West, Supplying and Financing Education: Options and Trends under Growing Fiscal Restraints
Alan Peacock, Subsidization and Promotion of the Arts
PART III. NORMATIVE ISSUES OF GLOBAL TRADE
Dennis C. Mueller, A Global Competition Policy for a Global Economy
Anne O. Krueger and Chonira E. Aturupane, International Trade in 'Bads'
Deepak Lal, Social Standards and Social Dumping
About the Authors
The 1997 Symposium of the Egon-Sohmen-Foundation, which gave rise to this book, took place in the United States, on the East Coast between New Y C)rk and New Haven, more precisely in Stamford (Conn.). The original choice had been a place close to Yale University, where Egon Sohmen taught economics from 1958 to 1960, subsequent to his period at MIT. But the hotel in New Haven was closed down by a new owner-to pass through a process of creative destruction. Change of ownership-on a large scale and as a transition from public to private hands-had been the topic of the preceding Egon Sohmen-Symposium (in Budapest in 1996) published under the head ing: Privatization at the End of the Century (Springer-Verlag, 1997). Yet mere change of ownership, some of us at the Foundation felt in subsequent months, was too narrow a focus to properly deal with the movement under consideration: a transition of ownership together with a general move towards a competitive market system charac terized by global openness, uncertainty, decentralized risk-bearing, and the increasing importance of information and innovation.