AHA-BUCH

Journalism Education in Countries with Limited Media Freedom

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ISBN-13:
9781433110856
Einband:
Buch
Erscheinungsdatum:
08.05.2010
Seiten:
263
Autor:
Beate Josephi
Gewicht:
502 g
Format:
231x151x25 mm
Serie:
1, Mass Communication and Journalism
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Exklusives Verkaufsrecht für: Gesamte Welt.
Contents: Beate Josephi: Introduction - Guo Zhongshi: Through Barbed Wires: Context, Content, and Constraints for Journalism Education in China - Andrew Duffy: Shooting Rubber Bands at the Stars: Preparing to Work Within the Singapore System - Judith Clarke: Cambodia: Educating Journalists in a World of Poverty, Corruption, and Power Abuse - Nibal Thawabteh: Palestinian Media Map: Production Congestion and Consumption Dispersion - Abdulmonam Al-Hasani: Teaching Journalism in Oman: Recent Obstacles and Future Plans - Ibrahim Saleh: Journalism Education in Egypt: Politically Hazed and Socially Confused - Stephen Ogongo Ongong'a: The Challenges for Kenya's Journalism Education - Bernardin Mfumbusa: Tanzania's Journalism Education at Crossroads: Western Models, Local Realities - Cláudia Lago/Richard Romancini: Aspects of Journalism Education in Brazil - Elena Vartanova/Maria Lukina/Luisa Svitich/Alla Shiryaeva: Between Tradition and Innovation: Journalism Education in Russia - Tudor Vlad/Madalina Balasescu: Few Educators, Many Media and Journalism Programs: Journalism and Mass Communication Education in Romania After the Fall of Communism - Thomas Bauer: The Challenge of Transition: Development of Journalism Culture in Croatia - Beate Josephi: Conclusions.
Since the 1990s journalism education programs have expanded exponentially around the world, but media freedom has not. Globally comparative, this edited volume assesses journalism education and the challenging environment in which it is delivered in countries with a partly free or not free status according to global press freedom. The countries covered include China, Singapore, Cambodia, Palestine, Oman, Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Brazil, Russia, Romania, and Croatia. Contributors demonstrate through careful analysis that wealthy nations are able to set the terms of their journalism education while less affluent countries are more open to the influence of foreign NGOs. Although this book evidences the disconnection between what is taught and what can be practiced, it also illustrates the degree to which journalism education can be an agent of change.