The Planner's Guide to Natural Resource Conservation:
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The Planner's Guide to Natural Resource Conservation:

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ISBN-13:
9780387981673
Einband:
Ebook
Seiten:
258
Autor:
Adrian X. Esparza
eBook Typ:
PDF
eBook Format:
EPUB
Kopierschutz:
1 - PDF Watermark
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:
"Much of the country's recent population growth is situated in exurban areas. By many accounts exurbanization has become the dominant pattern of land development in the country and there is no indication it will slow in the foreseeable future (Theobald 2005; Brown et al. 2005; Glennon and Kretser 2005). By definition, exurban development takes place beyond the metropolitan fringe, often in rural and remote areas. The development of new exurban communities is a growing trend, especially in the West. In this case, developers and homebuilders seek large tracts of land, up to thousands of acres, in rural areas (typically within 50 miles of a large city) where they plan entire communities consisting of commercial, retail and residential land uses. Recreational amenities such as golf courses and hiking/biking trails are often included in these master-planned developments.

Our philosophy is reflected in the book's two objectives. First, we seek to document the extent and impacts of exurban development across the country. At issue is demonstrating why planners and the public-at-large should be concerned about exurbanization. We will demonstrate that even though exurbanization favors amenity rich regions, it affects all areas of the country through the loss of agricultural and grazing lands, impacts to watersheds and land modification. A summary of environmental impacts is presented, including the loss of wildlands and agricultural productivity, land modification, soil erosion, impacts to terrestrial hydrologic systems, the loss of biodiversity, nonnative and endangered species and other topics.

Our second aim is to provide readers from diverse (nonscientific) backgrounds with a working knowledge of how and why exurbanization impacts environmental systems. This is accomplished by working closely to ensure contributors follow a specific outline for each chapter. First, contributors will spell out fundamental concepts, principles and processes that apply to their area of expertise (e.g., riparian areas). Contributors will move beyond a cursory understanding of ecological processes without overwhelming readers with the dense material found typically in specialized texts. For this reason, visuals and other support materials will be integral to each chapter. We have chosen contributors carefully based on their record as research scientists and acumen as educators. Second, once the mechanics have been laid out, authors will explain how and why land development in nearby areas influences ecosystems. Issues of interdependency, modification and adaptation, spatial scale and varying time horizons will be featured. Third, contributors will weigh in on the pros and cons of various land-development schemes. Fourth, authors will share their thinking on the merits of conservation devices such as wildlife corridors, open-space requirements and watershed management districts. Finally, each chapter will conclude by identifying pitfalls to avoid and highlighting "best practices" that will mitigate environmental problems or avoid them altogether. In sum, after completing each chapter, readers should have a firm grasp of relevant concepts and processes, an understanding of current research and know how to apply science to land-use decisions."
Section 1: Exurbanization in Perspective: History,

Impacts and Science Fundamentals



Chapter 1. The Dimensions of Exurban Development in the United States

Author: Adrian X. Esparza



Chapter 2. The Economic Consequences of Exurban Land Development

Author: J. Edward de Steiguer



Chapter 3. Land Fragmentation in Exurban Areas

Author: David Theobald



Chapter 4. Fundamental Concepts in Ecology and Environmental Systems

Author: Guy R. McPherson



Section 2: Exurban Land Development, Habitat and Wildlife



Chapter 5. Biodiversity and Residential Development Beyond the Fringe

Authors: Jane Bock and Carl Bock



Chapter 6. Wildlife Corridors and Exurban Land Development

Author: Stephen DeStefano


Chapter 7. Birds, Nesting and Exurban Land Conversion

Author: R. William Mannan



Chapter 8. The Urban-Wildlands Interface and the Importance of Wildlife and Wildlife Habitats in Cities Adjacent to Wildlands.

Authors: William Shaw and Rachel McCaffrey



Section 3: Vegetation, Climate Change and Fire (new section)



Chapter 9. The Impacts of Rural Land Development on Vegetation (new chapter)

This chapter describes the properties of major vegetation eco-regions in the United States, and explains how and why exurban development alters ecological processes over varying spatial and temporal scales. It also discusses why specific development densities and configurations are best suited for particular vegetation regimes, and points to mitigation techniques that have proven most successful.



Chapter 10. Climate Change and Ecology in Rural Lands (new chapter)

Global climate change is modifying ecological processes at the regional scale as temperatures rise and precipitation patterns change. This chapter describes how these changes likely will affect exurban landscapes, alter ecological processes, and introduce new constraints to conservation and preservation in rural areas.



Chapter 11. Exurban Encroachment, Fire and Forest Ecology (new chapter)

Even though encroachment is long standing, the proliferation of second and seasonal homes in pristine forested areas has grown in recent decades. This trend has raised alarms because the incidence of fires has escalated and, with it, the rise of property damage. The objective of this chapter is to describe the causes and mechanics of fires and identify planning techniques that can mitigate and minimize exposure to fire risks.



Section 4: Water Resources, Wetlands and

Storm Water Management



Chapter 12. Impacts of Exurban Development on Water Quality and Quantity

Authors: Kathleen Lohse and Adina Merenlender



Chapter 13. Exurban Land Development, Wetlands and Riparian Areas

Authors: Mark Briggs, Ann Audrey and Kendall Kroesen



Chapter 14. Storm Water Management in Exurbia

Authors: Evan Canfield and Richard Hawkins



Section 5: Science-Based Planning in Exurban Areas



Chapter 15. A Science-based Framework for Conservation based on Rare and Endangered Species: The Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan

Authors: Robert J. Steidl and William Shaw



Chapter 16. Integrating Science with Planning Practice (new chapter)

This chapter highlights planning tools and techniques that have proven successful in preserving environmental integrity at regional and local scales. The chapter presents case studies in which environmental scientists, regional planners, and land managers have joined forces to promote rural ecological sustainability through comprehensive plans, ordinances and site-specific techniques.



Chapter 17. Summary and Synthesis: the Role of Science in Exurban Land Development

Authors: Adrian Esparza and Guy R. McPherson
Much of the country's recent population growth is situated in exurban areas. By many accounts exurbanization has become the dominant pattern of land development in the country and there is no indication it will slow in the foreseeable future (Theobald 2005; Brown et al. 2005; Glennon and Kretser 2005). By definition, exurban development takes place beyond the metropolitan fringe, often in rural and remote areas. The development of new exurban communities is a growing trend, especially in the West. In this case, developers and homebuilders seek large tracts of land, up to thousands of acres, in rural areas (typically within 50 miles of a large city) where they plan entire communities consisting of commercial, retail and residential land uses. Recreational amenities such as golf courses and hiking/biking trails are often included in these master-planned developments.

Our philosophy is reflected in the book's two objectives. First, we seek to document the extent and impacts of exurban development across the country. At issue is demonstrating why planners and the public-at-large should be concerned about exurbanization. We will demonstrate that even though exurbanization favors amenity rich regions, it affects all areas of the country through the loss of agricultural and grazing lands, impacts to watersheds and land modification. A summary of environmental impacts is presented, including the loss of wildlands and agricultural productivity, land modification, soil erosion, impacts to terrestrial hydrologic systems, the loss of biodiversity, nonnative and endangered species and other topics.

Our second aim is to provide readers from diverse (nonscientific) backgrounds with a working knowledge of how and why exurbanization impacts environmental systems. This is accomplished by working closely to ensure contributors follow a specific outline for each chapter. First, contributors will spell out fundamental concepts, principles and processes that apply to their area of expertise (e.g., riparian areas). Contributors will move beyond a cursory understanding of ecological processes without overwhelming readers with the dense material found typically in specialized texts. For this reason, visuals and other support materials will be integral to each chapter. We have chosen contributors carefully based on their record as research scientists and acumen as educators. Second, once the mechanics have been laid out, authors will explain how and why land development in nearby areas influences ecosystems. Issues of interdependency, modification and adaptation, spatial scale and varying time horizons will be featured. Third, contributors will weigh in on the pros and cons of various land-development schemes. Fourth, authors will share their thinking on the merits of conservation devices such as wildlife corridors, open-space requirements and watershed management districts. Finally, each chapter will conclude by identifying pitfalls to avoid and highlighting "best practices" that will mitigate environmental problems or avoid them altogether. In sum, after completing each chapter, readers should have a firm grasp of relevant concepts and processes, an understanding of current research and know how to apply science to land-use decisions.

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