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Rubicon
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Rubicon

The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic, Nominiert: Nibbies 2004, Nominiert: Samuel Johnson Prize 2004, Ausgezeichnet: Hessell-Tiltman History Prize 2004
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ISBN-13:
9780349115634
Einband:
Taschenbuch
Seiten:
464
Autor:
Tom Holland
Gewicht:
395 g
Format:
197x126x30 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Aufstieg und Untergang der Römischen Republik: Mit stilistischer Brillanz und historischem Scharfsinn erzählt Tom Holland die römische Geschichte von ihren etruskischen Anfängen bis zur Ermordung Caesars.
* Ongoing author PR activity to include media interviews and appearances at literary festivals * Read on BBC Radio 5 January 04 * Review coverage across the national press * Key Abacus title for summer-reading promotions * Reading copies available
The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall.It is a story of incomparable drama. This was the century of Julius Caesar, the gambler whose addiction to glory led him to the banks of the Rubicon, and beyond; of Cicero, whose defence of freedom would make him a byword for eloquence; of Spartacus, the slave who dared to challenge a superpower; of Cleopatra, the queen who did the same.
Tom Holland brings to life this strange and unsettling civilization, with its extremes of ambition and self-sacrifice, bloodshed and desire. Yet alien as it was, the Republic still holds up a mirror to us. Its citizens were obsessed by celebrity chefs, all-night dancing and exotic pets; they fought elections in law courts and were addicted to spin; they toppled foreign tyrants in the name of self-defence. Two thousand years may have passed, but we remain the Romans' heirs.