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Can the Subaltern Speak?

Reflections on the History of an Idea
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ISBN-13:
9780231512855
Einband:
EPUB
Seiten:
0
Autor:
Rosalind Morris
Serie:
Columbia University Press
eBook Typ:
Adobe Digital Editions
eBook Format:
EPUB
Kopierschutz:
2 - DRM Adobe
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Introduction, by Rosalind C. Morris Part 1 Text
"Can the Subaltern Speak?" revised edition, from the "History" chapter of Critique of Postcolonial Reason, by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Part 2 Contexts and Trajectories
Reflections on "Can the Subaltern Speak?" Subaltern Studies after Spivak, by Partha Chatterjee Postcolonial Studies: Now That's History, by Ritu Birla
The Ethnical Affirmation of Human Rights: Gayatri Spivak's Intervention, by Drucilla Cornell Part 3 Speaking of (Not) Hearing: Death and the Subaltern
Death and the Subaltern, by Rajeswawri Sunder Rajan
Between Speaking and Dying: Some Imperatives in the Emergence of the Subaltern in the Context of U.S. Slavery, by Abdul JanMohamed
Subalterns at War, by Michele Barrett
Part 4 Contemporaneities and Possible Futures: (Not) Speaking and Hearing
Biopower and the New International Division of Reproductive Labor, by Pheng Cheah
Moving from Subalternity: Indigenous Women in Guatemala and Mexico, by Jean Franco
Part 5 In Response
In Response: Looking Back, Looking Forward, by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak
Appendix Can the Subaltern Speak? Bibliography
Contributors
Index
Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's original essay "Can the Subaltern Speak?" transformed the analysis of colonialism through an eloquent and uncompromising argument that affirmed the contemporary relevance of Marxism while using deconstructionist methods to explore the international division of labor and capitalism's "worlding" of the world. Spivak's essay hones in on the historical and ideological factors that obstruct the possibility of being heard for those who inhabit the periphery. It is a probing interrogation of what it means to have political subjectivity, to be able to access the state, and to suffer the burden of difference in a capitalist system that promises equality yet withholds it at every turn.