AHA-BUCH

Menagerie
-24 %

Menagerie

The History of Exotic Animals in England
 Buch
Sofort lieferbar | Lieferzeit:3-5 Tage I

Unser bisheriger Preis:ORGPRICE: 34,75 €

Jetzt 26,39 €*

Alle Preise inkl. MwSt. | zzgl. Versand
ISBN-13:
9780198714705
Einband:
Buch
Erscheinungsdatum:
01.01.2016
Seiten:
349
Autor:
Caroline Grigson
Gewicht:
686 g
Format:
241x149x30 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

The story of the panoply of exotic animals that were brought into Britain from time immemorial until the foundation of the London Zoo. A tale replete with the extravagant, the eccentric, and - on occasion - the downright bizarre.
The story of the panoply of exotic animals that were brought into Britain from time immemorial until the foundation of the London Zoo. A tale replete with the extravagant, the eccentric, and - on occasion - the downright bizarre.
Foreword by Juliet Clutton-Brock; 1 From the Normans to the Tudors; 2 The Stuarts, 1603-1688; 3 George III, c.1760-1811; 4 George IV, as Regent and King, 1811-1830; 6 William IV, c. 1830-1837; Conclusions; Glossary; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Menagerie is the story of the panoply of exotic animals that were brought into Britain from time immemorial until the foundation of the London Zoo - a tale replete with the extravagant, the eccentric, and - on occasion - the downright bizarre. From Henry III's elephant at the Tower, to George IV's love affair with Britain's first giraffe and Lady Castlereagh's recalcitrant ostriches, Caroline Grigson's tour through the centuries amounts to an impressively detailed history of exotic animals in Britain. On the way we encounter a host of fascinating and outlandish creatures, including the first peacocks and popinjays, Thomas More's monkey, James I's cassowaries in St James's Park, and Lord Clive's zebra - which refused to mate with adonkey, until the donkey was painted with stripes.But this is not just the story of the animals themselves. It also the story of all those who came into contact with them: the people who owned them, the merchants who bought and sold them, the seamen who carried them to our shores, the naturalists who wrote about them, the artists who painted them, the itinerant showmen who worked with them, the collectors who collected them. And last but not least, it is about all those who simply came to see and wonder at them, from kings, queens, and noblesto ordinary men, women, and children, often impelled by no more than simple curiosity and a craving for novelty.